How do I sue Sprint in Small Claims Court?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

How do I sue Sprint in Small Claims Court?

Hi, I’m located in Washington State. My questions is this. I’m trying to file a small claims against Sprint. The courthouse told me I can only file small claims against those who reside in my county. Sprint’s actual Corporate office doesn’t even reside in the state of Washington. So my question is Do I file it against the Corporate office even though they reside out of state? or do I file it against the store that I’ve having issues with since they are in my county. If I do file it against the store, who would I file it against? the Store manager? The courthouse is very ineffective at helping with this and I plan to bring this issue up when I actually get a case with the Judge.

Asked on December 13, 2016 under Business Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

The courthouse's job is NOT to give you legal advice--in fact, both legally and ethically, they can't advise you, because they are a neutral third party. Therefore, the courthouse staff has done nothing wrong.
Whether you can file against the store depends on why you are suing. If the store is owned by the provider and you have a claim against the provider, you can then very likely sue their local "office" or presence, which is the store.
If the store is NOT owned by the provider, however, then you can only sue the store if the store itself did something wrong: such as if the store employees lied to you about something important (i.e. committed fraud) or violated some contractual obligation which the store, not the provider had (suing for breach of contract). But if your claim is against the provider, you cannot sue a store not owned by them; a store not owned by them is not liable for the provider's actions or ommissions. 
If you can sue the store, if the store is owned by a corporation or LLC, you sue the corporation or LLC. If it's owned by an individual, you sue the owner personally.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption