How do collect a judgement awarded to me?

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How do collect a judgement awarded to me?

I took my former landlord to court over 2 years ago and I was awarded $21,600. I still have not seen a dime. He owns at least 2 rental properties so there is no reason not to pay me. How do I make him pay what he owes?

Asked on July 11, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, New Hampshire

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Most States in this country have a process called "abstacting a judgment" where a form is filled out by the person holding the judgment, the court clerk "seals" the abstract and then the abstract can be recorded on property owned by the judgment debtor as a lien to be paid in the event the property is sold.

Other ways to collect is to fill out a form to have an order of examination of the debtor which a hearing date is set, the debtor is served with the issue order and if he/she shows, you ask questions regarding location of assets, bank accounts and other items of value. From this information you can have a writ of execution and notice of levy issued on known bank accounts.

The same goes with rental properties. If you know the address of the renatls, you can have the tenants served with a notice of levy and writ of execution by the sheriff where they pay their monthly ret to the sheriff which ultimatly be sent to you for pay down on the judgment owed. There are typically forms in each State for this. Hope this helps you moving in the right direction to collect on the judgment owed you.

 

 

 


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