What vehicles are covered by lemon laws?

Lemon laws will vary depending on the state in which the consumer is located and where the vehicle was purchased. While all of them are designed to protect consumers from defective vehicles, the specific types of vehicles that are covered will differ depending on your location. For example, some states will cover used vehicles or leased vehicles, while others will not. Some have separate laws, but do cover both new and used vehicles. Some states will include motorcycles in the law, others may include motor homes.

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Is the lender responsible under lemon law as well?

If a consumer purchases a car using a financing plan from a lender, and the car turns out to be a lemon, the lender is not generally held responsible. The responsibility for a lemon, i.e. a defective vehicle under warranty, falls with the holder of the warranty, which is typically the car manufacturer.

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Are leased cars covered by the lemon laws?

Whether or not a leased vehicle is covered by lemon law protection will depend on the state in which the vehicle is leased. Each state in the US has its own particular set of laws regarding’lemon’ vehicles, meaning those that are considered defective and for which the manufacturer/warranty issuer is held financially responsible.

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What is a lemon?

A’lemon law’ is a law that is designed to protect consumers against products that are defective or aren’t manufactured to proper standards. In most cases the term lemon law is used to refer to vehicle purchases and a ‘lemon’ refers to the car in question. There are various lemon laws in place and they can vary for each state. On a federal level, however, the main lemon law is called the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

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Do car problems have to occur within 12 months of purchase to qualify under lemon law?

In order to be protected by lemon law in most states, you’ll need to experience car problems within 12 to 24 months of purchase, or 12,000 to 24,000 miles. This time frame varies somewhat by state, so it’s important to check your state’s lemon law for specific requirements. In addition to occurring within a certain time period, the problem must also be characterized as a substantial defect, meaning it must impact the use, value or safety of the car. The car manufacturer must also be given multiple opportunities to repair it. If repeated repairs fail to correct the issue, then your car may be considered a lemon.

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What should I do if I suspect my car is a lemon?

If you believe your car is a lemon, you may be able to receive some kind of compensation from your car manufacturer, but first you’ll need to build a case. Start by researching lemon laws in your state. The requirements for showing that your car is a lemon vary from each state to the next. For example, in some states you must attempt to repair the car at least three times, but in other states just one repair attempt may suffice.

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What happens if there are problems after my car’s warranty expires?

Whenever you purchase a vehicle that is still under warranty and a problem with the vehicle occurs, you can typically take the vehicle to any dealer authorized by the manufacturer and the issue will be taken care of free of charge to you. After the vehicle’s warranty expires, however, almost every instance in which a repair must be made to your vehicle will be your responsibility to deal with, regardless of the condition of your vehicle at the time of the warranty’s expiration. However, there may be limited exceptions to this rule.

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Is it okay to drive a car while we determine if it falls under lemon law?

If you find yourself in possession of a vehicle that falls under the lemon law (a vehicle found defective after purchase), you may still need to use the vehicle for transportation while the mediation and/or legal action is taking place. Many people are unsure whether or not they’re allowed to do this. The answer is yes, under lemon law, in most situations, there will not be a problem should you continue using the vehicle.

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