Can a court order alimony payments after divorce or separation?

During the process of dissolving your marriage, the court may order you to pay alimony payments after the divorce is final. The requirement to make these payments may be either temporary or permanent, depending on the circumstances. Once a divorce is final, however, a court will only alter or change an alimony decree if the circumstances of the parties change – they will not create a new alimony agreement after a divorce is final where no alimony agreement exists.

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Can a court order payment of spousal support during a marriage or during separation?

If one spouse is not receiving enough financial support from the other spouse during the marriage, he or she may be able to file a lawsuit to make the other provide support. In addition if one spouse has applied for and received support from the county, then the county may file a court order to get reimbursed for the support they paid out, what they will continue to pay out, and any lawyer or court fees associated with that action. Finally, if you are separated but not legally divorced, you may also be entitled to support under a legal separation agreement.

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How long will a spouse have to pay (or be able to receive) alimony?

Alimony payments are awarded in order for one spouse to provide continued support to the other after the marriage has ended. The length of time that alimony payments must continue to be paid will vary depending on why the alimony is awarded and based on other factors, such as the length of the marriage. Alimony payments may be temporary and continue until the divorce is final, until the spouse receiving the payments becomes self sufficient, or permanently.

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What are some ways to collect when your ex won’t pay alimony?

When your former spouse is not paying alimony, returning to divorce or family court should be your first action. Seek the help of an experienced divorce or family law attorney to represent you. Show the court evidence that your former spouse has not made payments, has not made full payments, or has not made timely payments. Collect written proof of late or partial payments. Explain how your former spouse’s actions are causing you financial difficulty.

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