Driving without a license/ failure to appear

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Driving without a license/ failure to appear

my wife recieved a ticket for driving without a license. She missed her court date due to a death in the family and was in florida when her colorado court date happend. I just called the court and they have now issued a warrant. the clerk told me to have her come down to the court anytime between 8-5 to try and resolve the matter. what are the chances of them just arresting her on the spot? or will she just be able to pay and get on with her life? this is her first trouble she has ever been in

Asked on May 11, 2009 under Criminal Law, Colorado

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You should talk to a lawyer with an office in or near the same town as the court, to be certain, as he or she is likely to know from experience how that court, and the local police, tend to handle things like this.  One place to start looking for that attorney would be our website, http://attorneypages.com

She will almost certainly have to either post bail or pay the fine and court costs when she goes to deal with this.  If she doesn't have a valid driver's license now, I'd suggest that somebody give her a ride, because usually the police HQ is very close to the court, and cops are sometimes at the court clerk's office on business, and she could get another ticket on this trip!

LAR, Member CA State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

You should appear at court and pay the fines and incur whatever penalties.  Typically, in these situations, the courts will be much more interested in resolving the matter than arresting, particularly if this is her first offense.  But bring evidence of the family death and accompanying travel to show why she missed the date.  Don't avoid this.  Take care of it ASAP.


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