Does email constitute as an acceptable method of notifying a tenant as to damages to be taken from their security deposit?

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Does email constitute as an acceptable method of notifying a tenant as to damages to be taken from their security deposit?

After contacting my previous landlord via phone as to why he didn’t return my $1350 security deposit he advised me there were “damages” and that he sent me an itemized list via email. I didn’t receive this email and it may have gone to the spam; I’m not sure. Doesn’t he have to send me this my mail to ensure that I receive it? I gave him my forwarding address via certified mail accompanied with my 30 day notice. I was on a month-to-month lease and by the way I dispute the “damages” he claims as we did a walk through upon vacating the premises and he didn’t mention them.

Asked on December 6, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Good question. In most states in this country the requirement that a former tenant must be given notice by his former landlord at his or her forwarding mailing address or in person. E mail notification usually is insuffient unless the e mail transmitted has a receipt upon it showing that the recipient actually received the transmission.

The problem with e mail transmissions are that the mailing may never be actually read by the recipient even if the address sent was correct because it could go into a "spam" folder.

I would write your former landlord advising that you never received the e mail concerning the itemizations for damages and that you contest the damage charges. Keep a copy of the letter for future need. 


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