Divorce and Health Insurance

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Divorce and Health Insurance

I have been married one month, and filed for a divorce recently. I promised my husband when we separated that I would keep his 2 children (not my children) on my health insurance policy for the next 6 months. I have since then realized that I am paying a lot for the insurance and want to take the children off my policy. My husband is unemployed. Am I liable to keep them on my policy while the divorce is happening because I agreed to over an instant message? Is that considered a contract? I also need to know if he has grounds to ask me for any alimony being that the marriage was one month.

Asked on May 20, 2009 under Family Law, California

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

For reliable advice, you need to speak with an attorney, and let her or him know all of the unique facts of your case.  One place to look for a divorce lawyer in your area is our website, http://attorneypages.com

As far as alimony goes, I think it is extremely unlikely that you have to worry about this, after a one-month marriage, unless you had lived together for a very long time before the actual marriage.

The health insurance for his children is a slightly more difficult question, but only slightly.  If the two of you had put together an agreement settling all the money and property issues between you, and that promise was one of several promises going both ways, then the agreement might be a binding contract.  But a promise that you give, without getting anything in return, isn't usually looked at the same way.  This is why you need to give a lawyer all the facts, to make sure you're getting the right answer.


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