Can the landlord give me an eviction notion, just because the **** enforcement task force came to my apartment, and found that there was no drugs.

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Can the landlord give me an eviction notion, just because the **** enforcement task force came to my apartment, and found that there was no drugs.

The DETF was given false imformation about illegal **** house. When they came and searched my apartment, they found no drugs or paraphernalia of any kind. But me and another person, (A visting friend) had warrants, and so was arested. I got out on bail. And went home, later that day, I was given notion that me and my family were going to be evicted for selling drugs. My home is not a **** house. I have 1 child under the age of 15, and 2 teenages over the age of 15. But still under th age of 18. I always make sure my kids are not doing drugs, or in gangs, or doing anything illegal.

Asked on June 24, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Hawaii

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

The laws that control what you can, or cannot, be evicted for, vary from one state to another, and  I'm not a Hawaii attorney.  For advice you can rely on, you need to have a lawyer in your area review your lease, if you have one, and all of the facts of your case.  One place to find a qualified attorney is our website, http://attorneypages.com

It isn't at all uncommon for a written lease to include language that makes it a violation of the lease if you use the premises for criminal activity;  some states also have laws that make drug dealing a valid ground for eviction whether or not it's mentioned in a lease.  However, an unproven accusation isn't a fact, and if the supposed drug dealing is the only reason given for the eviction, you should have a good chance of winning, so you should definitely follow up with a lawyer.


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