Can my parents sue someone who posted defamatory things about them?

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Can my parents sue someone who posted defamatory things about them?

To compress this story as much as humanly possible, I took possession of a

stray dog and went through proper channels to find the owner. Out of a couple of people that called, one woman came forward to claim it was determined, after questioning, that it might not be hers. She subsequently flew off the handle, abused any any and all ways she could get me in trouble. She reported me to SPCA for animal abuse, filed for stolen property saying that I stole her, came to my parent’s house to make a scene, told neighbors my parents stole her dog, posted on Craigslist naming my parents, sister and myself while also providing our phone numbers and my parent’s address, publicly. We were harassed by her anyone she gave our info to and then she somehow texted links to her Craigslist posts about us to my boss. What can we do at this point? We are currently stuck in an investigation over the dog she needlessly brought the rest of my family into it. Can we sue?

Asked on June 11, 2018 under Personal Injury, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If the woman's accusation(s) of animal abuse and theft are factually untrue, as they appear to be based on what you write, your parents could sue her for defamation. Defamation is stating or making to third parties (other people--either specific other people or by publishing/posting/etc.) untrue factual allegations or assertions which damage your repuations. False public claims of theft or animal abuse, which would be untrue factual claims damaging reputation, would meet the defination of defamation.


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