Can I sue my employer for harassment and retaliation?

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Can I sue my employer for harassment and retaliation?

My supervisors do not do their jobs. My co-workers and I end up picking up the slack all across the board. I complained to my adminstrator and now we are being retailated against. My supervisors has gone out of their way to write me up for any reason. For example, my supervisor issued verbal warning for wearing a sweater. Everyone else is wearing a sweater, including my supervisor. One of my supervisors became angry and said he didn’t want me “bitching” about anything. This started immediately after our complaint. I am sick of it. They threaten us with losing our jobs. What can I do?

Asked on October 22, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You can file a complaint with the Wisconsin Department of Labor (called the Department of Workforce Development now) if you believe that the actions add up to a form of discrimination and the harassment is due to your being a "protected class".   Those in a protected class include those subject to harassment because of their race, color, creed, ancestry, national origin, age (40 and up), disability, sex, arrest or conviction record, marital status, sexual orientation or membership in the military reserve.  If not doing their job had something to do with violations of the law then you would be protected under whistle blower statutes.  But if you do not fit in to these categories then protection through a state agency may not be the avenue.  You may have to bring suit privately.  Possibly a hostile workplace issue that you can explore with an attorney. Good luck. 


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