CanI sue my employer for constant verbal abuse?

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CanI sue my employer for constant verbal abuse?

I work in a retail outlet and my boss and supervisor verbally abuse all the employees everyday all day. They call us retards, dumb asses, morons, the list goes on and on (mostly involve swearing). We have tried to file OSHA complaints without success. Each one of us are abused almost by the minute. In 4 years my employer has hired 104 employees; our workforce is only 18 employees. 98 of them quit within 2 months; 4 are still employed; 2 have been fired. I have names of all employees, and many of them are willing to testify for reparations. Can we sue our employer? If so, how can we go about this?

Asked on September 10, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I would seek consultation from an employment attorney in your area.  Basically you have an harassment suit to ask about unless you feel that what is being said is in someway discriminatory and you are in some way a "protected" class under the law.  That would be racially tinted comments or sexually tinted comments.  Otherwise it is just not a nice place to work and the employees, who are employees "at will", can either hang around to hear it or quit and work somewhere else.  Just because someone is placed in the position of being a manager or supervisor does not mean that they have the needed people skills for the job to motivate their employees. And obviously the abuse comes from "the top" and trickles down.  Good luck.  


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