Can I sue a company for showing favoritism to their family members that are on staff?

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Can I sue a company for showing favoritism to their family members that are on staff?

I work for a non-profit company and the owner treats her family different then the rest of staff. I am the Montessori teacher and my aid is the owners daughter-in-law and she makes double the salary that I do with no degree or experience teaching. They use company money to pay their car, house payment, and even bought her son a tour bus and pays for his apartment with the money the company makes. What can I do, I am tired of all of it?

Asked on September 1, 2010 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

A non-profit or a not for profit by its very definition does not distribute surplus moneys made to its owners or shareholders but instead uses the funds to pursue its goals.  So the actions that you are describing, by their very nature, violate the definition. Not for profits are granted many advantages under the law and receive many tax benefits because of their lofty goals.  What the owners seem to be doing is hiding behind the definition and using it to their advantage, distributing wealth to the owners through the corporation.  What can you do?  Well, you can quit.  If you have an employment contract you can go and seek legal consultation as to breaking the contract and if there is a legal basis for it. You can also speak to an attorney about suing them for discrimination but it really may not apply here.  Were you considering turning them in to some authorities?  Speak with an attorney.  Good luck.


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