If an officer has requested a statement from me regarding acrimethat Iwas a witness to, canI give a notarizedwriting or mustI meet him in person?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

If an officer has requested a statement from me regarding acrimethat Iwas a witness to, canI give a notarizedwriting or mustI meet him in person?

A “friend” stole a whole book of scratch tickets from her job. She brought them to my house and we scratched them. She had my boyfriend and I cash in winners for her. When she was busted she told the cops that she took them and that we didn’t know they were stolen. They then came and got a verbal statement from my boyfriend but I was at work at the time. The officer in charge left his card for me to call him, which I did.  He now wants me to go to station to give a statement. He said he’s not arresting me for anything to do with his case but if I have a warrant (which I do in different county for fines) then he will, however he can’t run my info until face-to-face?

Asked on April 13, 2011 under Criminal Law, Arizona

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Listen, it might be a good idea for you and your boyfriend to speak with a criminal attorney in your area.  Although some may say that doing so given an appearance that you were in some way involved in this whole thing, I think that because of the warrant and the "promise" - although I would like to say more of a threat - to arrest you, you need some leverage behind you.  And you really need someone to help you deal with the fines and the warrant.  Even if you are pulled over for driving through a light or a broken tail light or whatever, you will be arrested.  Do you need to live in fear of that?  I don't think so.  Get help and cooperate fully.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption