Can I get unemployement if I quit because of a hostile work enviorment?

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Can I get unemployement if I quit because of a hostile work enviorment?

My boss show favoritism to some and to others she treats with complete disrespect. Over the past year I have been sick more times than I ever have and I have been told by medical doctors that its caused by stress. I recently was written up for accusations which were wrong. I wrote 2 letters to HR – 1 about how I disagreed with my write up in detail and 1 was a complaint on my boss and how she makes me feel constantly stressed in a hostile enviornment. I meet with HR and they said all they can do is maybe offer management training to both managers of mine. What can I do?

Asked on August 8, 2011 Idaho

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, a workplace *may* be hostile--there is no requirement whatsoever that an employer treat an employee fairly, respectfully, considerately, etc., or that a boss not show favoritism to one or another employees. Quite simply, work can be a horrible place, and bosses horrible people, and that is legal (though unfair). Since there is nothing legally improper about what you say your boss is doing--that is, there is no legal protection against being treated the way you write you are treated--if you leave, it is a voluntary departure. A voluntary separation from employment, even if it's voluntary for good reasons (e.g. getting away from stress that is ruining your life or health), makes one ineligible for unemployment. So if you leave due to a "hostile" work environment, you cannot get unemplolyment compensation.


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