Can I be kicked out of my employee apartment if I drop some of my hours?

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Can I be kicked out of my employee apartment if I drop some of my hours?

I work as a private home health care aide. I rented the upstairs space in exchange for working 2 hours a day/5 days a week. When they fired the employee that lived downstairs and paid $700 in rent, I temporarily took over his hours. They decided that they wouldn’t be able to rent out 1 room again for that much money, so they made my job permanent. I want to go back to working 2 hours a day in exchange for my rent. Can they kick me out of my apartment if I do this?

Asked on July 12, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I hate to say this but it sounds as if none of this rental stuff is legal.  What I mean is that you may be renting an illegal apartment or the other apartment  - which you said is a room - may be illegal.  You have not given many details as to the type of house or building you are renting in which could be key to guidance here on some level.  The other issues you have is that you had an employment contract/rental contract all rolled in to one.  If they have changed the contract terms and you are not in agreement you have to figure out if they are willing to renegotiate (since you already did once by taking over the other persons hours temporarily) or you have enough to sue them for breach and to enforce the original contract.  Sounds like a lot here.  Ask them ad see what they say.  Then you will know how to proceed.  Good luck.


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