Can a large corporation legally charge my newly replaced debit card if I haven’t yet given them the new debit card number?

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Can a large corporation legally charge my newly replaced debit card if I haven’t yet given them the new debit card number?

I own a small business. I signed up for both internet and phone service to be auto billed per month by debit card. The internet service is from a major corp. The phone service is from a small provider. A few months later, I lost my card and cancelled it immediately. It was replaced by a new card, with a new card number.The smaller phone company called and notified that my old card number had not gone through, so I gave them the updated card info. Months afterwards, I realized that I forgot to update my info with the large internet corp, but to my surprise, the’ve been charging me every month.

Asked on April 10, 2012 under General Practice, California

Answers:

Madan Ahluwalia / Ahluwalia Law Professional Corporation

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You might want to check and make sure that the smaller phone company and the internet corporation are not the same company or subsidaries of a parent company.  Obviously they obtained the information from somewhere, and you are the most likely suspect.  In any event, you've been using the service all along, so don't expect to get your money back any time soon.  But if you want to investigate the matter further, try finding out how they got the new account information in the first place.  Best of luck!


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