Biological father died but is not listed on my birth certificate only on baptismal and other records do i have claim to his estate?

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Biological father died but is not listed on my birth certificate only on baptismal and other records do i have claim to his estate?

i was born in PA 46 years ago out of wedlock (he was having extramarrital affair in PA with my mother while he was working there). biological father is from louisiana. His name is not on my birth certificate (but ironically is on my sisters which is not his biological child but they were living together) he came to see me once or twice but never paid support my whole life. he recently died. can i ammend my birth certificate and am i entitled to anything from his estate? i do keep in touch with other members of the family and they acknowledge me but i dont want problems. i live in texas.

Asked on June 18, 2009 under Estate Planning, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I am sorry for your loss.  Louisiana carefully regulates who can and can not inherit from a father's estate.  They make clear and distinct differentiations between legitimate and illegitimate children, children who are acknowledges and who are considered "natural children" and further if a father dies with a Will or without.  What counts for "acknowledgement" also matters.  The fact that you were conceived in PA and resided there with your parents for a time may count.  Your best bet is to contact an attorney in LA who specializes in this type of law and seek consultation.  They will be able to answer what you need to inherit.  You can start here at attorneypages.com.  Good luck.


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