Are adult children legally responsible for the costs of obtaining death certificates etc. when there is no Will or directive?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Are adult children legally responsible for the costs of obtaining death certificates etc. when there is no Will or directive?

I have been estranged from my mother for over 20 years. I was only notified of her death 2 1/2 weeks afterwards and then only because afuneral home needed my consent for cremation. Since many years ago, we had set up a Neptune Society membership for her, I have been in contact with them, and they are now handling the cremation. The funeral parlor, however, is asking me to pay for their costs for obtaining death certificates and I don’t know what else. Am I legally responsible for these costs? They have not sent me a legal copy of her death certificate. Do I need one?

Asked on January 24, 2012 under Estate Planning, Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You really do not need a certified copy of your late mother's death certificate, but the Neptune Society does to cremate her. I would think that if an account was set up years ago for your mother with the Neptune Society that the payment on account would have covered the certified copy of your late mother's death certificate.

Techinically your mother's estate is responsible for the cost of the needed certified copy of the death certificate and other costs associated with a burial or cremation. However, if there are no assets in the estate to reimburse one for the costs of the death certificate, a friend or family member typically pays for the cost as well as other expenses associated with a burial or cremation. My experience is that the cost of a certified copy of a death certificate should not be much more than $10.00.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption