Am I responsible for medical bills from an accident that happened almost 2 years ago from an accident I caused even though I was never informed?

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Am I responsible for medical bills from an accident that happened almost 2 years ago from an accident I caused even though I was never informed?

I was involved in an accident 1 year and 10 months earlier; I caused the accident. I was insured and all the vehicles involved were taken care by my insurance. However, just a week ago a process server came to my door while I was not home trying to serve papers for possible medical bills from the person that my vehicle came into contact with. Where do I stand in this? There has been no record of medical claim or treatment prior to this last week since the accident. The processor has not physically handed me any papers at this tim; he will not leave them with my wife who has spoken to him.

Asked on June 25, 2012 under Uncategorized, Texas

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The property damage claim is separate from the personal injury claim.  Sometimes the injuries do not manifest themselves until after the accident.

What probably happened was that the injured party was unable to settle the case with your auto insurance company and that is why the lawsuit was filed.  When you are served with the summons and complaint (the complaint is the lawsuit attached to the summons) just refer the matter to your auto insurance company.  Your auto insurance company will provide you with an attorney at no cost to you and will handle the case for you.  In answer to your question, you are liable for a personal injury claim arising from the auto accident.  The personal injury claim will include compensation for the medical bills, compensation for pain and suffering, and compensation for wage loss.  Compensation for the medical bills is straight reimbursement.  Compensation for pain and suffering is an amount in addition to the medical bills.  Compensation for wage loss is straight reimbursement.


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