Security officer duties without training

I am an Administrative Assistant for a hospital. I was recently informed that it
will be my duty to wand visitors, check any bags/items that are brought in for
safety and possibly search individuals if the wand goes off. This is not within
my job classification nor have I been trained to do this. Is it legal to work in
Vermont doing security duties without training or licensing?

Asked on June 9, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Vermont

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, it is legal:
1) There are no regulations requiring licensing or training for security functions like those you describe.
2) Your employer, not you, decides what you job is: it doesn't matter if duties are not part of your normal classification, your employer can change you job classification or role at will.
What you describe is unwise: your lack of training increases the risk of liability for your employer in several ways (you not performing the job well, and so security being compromised; you being injured by someone you confront; you not knowing how to defuse a situation or restrain someone safely and so injuring another person; etc.), but the law does not require employers to make good or intelligent choices.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, it is legal:
1) There are no regulations requiring licensing or training for security functions like those you describe.
2) Your employer, not you, decides what you job is: it doesn't matter if duties are not part of your normal classification, your employer can change you job classification or role at will.
What you describe is unwise: your lack of training increases the risk of liability for your employer in several ways (you not performing the job well, and so security being compromised; you being injured by someone you confront; you not knowing how to defuse a situation or restrain someone safely and so injuring another person; etc.), but the law does not require employers to make good or intelligent choices.


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