QDRO

I had QDRO paperwork drawn up. I now represent
myself. I was told by the lawyer who drew up the
papers that I had to ha ve my ex husbands lawyer
sign the QDRO paperwork before I could have it
signed by the judge. I signed and sent the paperwork
to my ex’s lawyer. How long should I wait for her to
return it to me and what if she delays sending it?
Also can she make changes to it without my consent?
Please help.

Asked on June 16, 2016 under Family Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

A couple of weeks is a reasonable time to give the attorney to review the QDRO.  If the attorney still will not sign it, ask the court to set the matter for a hearing.  You may need to file a basic document called "Motion for Entry of QDRO".  Basically, you ask the court to make a decision on whether your QDRO is sufficient. 
To the last part of your question, no... ethically... the other attorney cannot make changes and present the order to your attorney without your consent.  However, keep in mind that shouldn't does not always mean they won't.  So... make sure your review any documents to insure their accuracy.


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