My boss asked me to forge President’s signature…

My boss asked me to forge the signature of the president of our company onto a credit card authorization form. Typically we use a signature stamp which is held in the Admin office, and only they are to authorize the signature. One day admin was not in the office and a signature stamp was needed, so my boss told me to cut his signature out of an old authorization form and paste it to the new one. Of course, i did not do this, but I feel this was very illegal. Looking for adivce and to see if I can take legal action regarding this?

Asked on June 13, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

It is illegal to forge someone else's signature, so you're right to have not done it, and you should continue to refuse to it in the future.

However, what legal action are you thinking of? If you were retailed against for not following an illegal order--i.e. if you've been fired, demoted, harassed, had pay or benefits cut, etc.--then you can file a claim (you want to get an employment attorney to represent you.) But if nothing has happened to you, then you haven't been damaged. If you haven't been damaged, there's nothing to claim for.

 


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