If I decline a job offer as a nurse practitioner, can I be held accountable to pay for interview expenses paid for by the practice?

I interviewed for a nurse practitioner position out of state. The owner of the practice offered to fly me out and pay for expenses accrued during this interview. While I was out there I was sure I would accept, and told him this verbally. He gave me a check which I cashed for reimbursement for flight/car. However once I got home and really began to think about it, I decided to not take the job. He sent me a contract which I did not sign. I sent a professional email telling him that I declined his offer. Now he is asking I pay for the interview expenses including loss of productivity for the day he spent with me interviewing. I have never signed any document and there was only a verbal agreement of tentative employment. Can I be held responsible for this monetary payment?

Asked on March 5, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

If there was no agreement PRIOR to you flying out that you would reimburse him for expenses if you declined the job, then you are not obligated to repay him--it requires your agreement to pay or reimburse expenses to create an enforceable obligation for you to do so. If he made the mistake of paying these things for you without getting an agreement that you would repay in a situation like this, that is his problem, not yours.


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