do i have a case if so for how much

im a vendor and i was giving a store credit for damage items and the lost prevention guy saw me walking out with the items and said i was stealing them he did not aproach me but he send emails to the rest of the stores in san diego with the companies name that i work for and my discription saying on the email to beware of this person that is stealing i still have not been aproach by anyone but another employee in the company told me that he saw this email in one of his stores

Asked on May 26, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If this has caused you any actual embarrassment or inconvenience, being stopped and perhaps searched, or if this has interefered with your business, you need to get a hold of a copy of that email, and see an attorney who is will file libel suit for you.  One place to look for the lawyer you need is our website, http://attorneypages.com

Libel is a false statement that damages your reputation, that makes you an object of scorn, ridicule or similar negativity.  In some cases the harm to your reputation has to be proved to exist, but if someone calls you a thief like this, if you can prove the statement, the only real question is, how much damages?  However, I can't rule out the possiblity that he would be able to assert a defense called a privilege here, because his very job is to do exactly what he did when there is a real shoplifter.  Your case is about its own unique facts, and sometimes a detail you might think is insignificant makes all the difference.  You need to give all the information you have to your attorney, for a reliable opinion about whether you have a case here.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.