What are the possibilities to have a disorderly conduct charge dismissed/sealed?

My boyfriend and I were together at a beach where they were doing fireworks. We stayed in the van for the whole show, 30 minutes, and when it was over we got back into the car to eat and waited for everyone in the lot to head out. A cop approached us and told us that it was time to leave. We said we would wrap up and then go. We finished eating and he comes back and we are still in the lot. The cop gave him a ticket and charged him with a disorderly conduct. My boyfriend is extremely worried that this will show up on his record when employers check his record. I told him we can fix this and have it dismissed/sealed? What tips can you guys provide me with? He is also an immigrant ofthe country and has never had anything on his record but the typical speeding parking tickets. Should he plead not guilty? What should we say to help his case?

Asked on July 5, 2016 under Criminal Law, New York

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Disorderly conduct is a violation and violations do not result in criminal records, however they are punishable by up to 15 days in jail and a fine. That having been said, anytime that a person is charged with a crime, even disorderly conduct, they should consult with a criminal law attorney. This is the best way to ensure that their case has the best outcome.


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