Can my old employer ban me from the premises?

I worked at a local theatre for years, had a relationship with the general manager non-sexual and left on good terms, full 2 week notice, didn’t steal, cheat, lie, etc. The manager and I had a falling out post employment and I came back to watch a movie and I was told I was banned from entering the premises and was refused from service. Is that legal? I haven’t done anything wrong and am not afraid of skeletons in the closet. I understand people being petty but didn’t think it could reach this level.

The worst part is that I know people who work there that have stolen, are on drugs, and have cheated on said general manager and they are still welcome.

Asked on November 17, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, California

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

It is legal. A private business has the right to ban individuals from its location, so long as they are not doing so due to race, color, national origin, religion, or disability. Banning someone due to a personal relationship with a manger is a valid, nondiscriminatory reason to do this. It is immature and unfair, but legal.


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