Can my employer terminate me if I was put on short term disability 2 weeks before my due date due to illness?

I have been employed with my company for 6 1/2 years, working on an account for another large company. My company is losing the contract with this customer and being replaced by another company. The current contract is supposed to be good with the company until the end of next year, however, through various agreements, different departments are transitioning at different times. My dept is transitioning to the new company on my due date, next month. My company issued a WARN letter notifying us of the elimination of our positions last month. Can they terminate while on maternity leave?

Asked on October 27, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Michigan

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Yes, unfortunately, you can be terminated while on maternity leave. They cannot terminate you *because* you are pregnant, giving birth, on maternity leave, etc. However, being pregnant, having a child, or being on maternity leave does not protect you from termination for unrelated reasons, such as  restructuring or downsizing; or, for that matter, for reasons specific to you but unrelated from the pregnancy, such as performance problems, insubordination, absenteeism, etc. All that is disallowed is making the pregnancy or the use of some approved or protected form of maternity leave (e.g. Family and Medical Leave Act leave)( the grounds for  termination; but being pregnant or on maternity leave does not act to protect or guaranty your job from all causes.


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