Can I sue for a mobile home that was promised to me?

I live with a 77 year man who put the trailer we both live in in my name. I have been here 5 years and have done and spent quite a large amount of money on this thinking that someday it would be mine. Well he got angry at me and took my name off. Now I am out the money. Is there something that I can do? Can I sue? I have done so much – new paint job on inside and outside, new toilets, new sinks and fixtures, new fences and gates, put a fish pond in backyard, landscaping, roofing, etc. You name it, I did it. All with my money, my labor and time. New security screen doors too and more.

Asked on September 17, 2011 under Real Estate Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If your name was placed on the registered title of a mobile home through California's Department of Motor Vehicle's by a certain individual, he cannot unilaterally take it off. I suggest that you go down to California's Department of Motor Vehicles to confirm whether or not your name was ever on registered title to the mobile home and if so for what period of time.

If there were representations that you would end up owning part of this mobile home by a certain person and in reliance upon these promises you expended time, effort and money in improving the unit, you have a legal and factual basis to bring a lawsuit against him based upon "promissory estoppel."

I suggest that you consult with an attorney about your situation.

Good luck.


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