As a renter in Wisconsin, what recourse do I have if the septic tank repeatedly backs up into my apartment?

I love where I rent. Lately though, at least on five different occasions, the sewer line overflow has backed up into my apartment. I have accumulated at least 15 hours of arduous vacuuming of excess water in order to avoid the water to flow into my dining area. I don’t think I should have to be doing this myself.

Asked on July 1, 2009 under Real Estate Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I'm not a Wisconsin attorney, and the law differs from one state to the next, but I can't imagine that this isn't a serious health code violation, and something that the law would consider as a habitability issue.  That means your landlord has to deal with this, especially since it isn't an isolated incident.  I would send a polite, carefully and accurately stated letter about the problem to your landlord, keeping a copy, as soon as possible.

If your landlord doesn't take care of this, please see an attorney in your area.  You pay the rent, and you're entitle to be free of problems like this.  One place to find a lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I'm not a Wisconsin attorney, and the law differs from one state to the next, but I can't imagine that this isn't a serious health code violation, and something that the law would consider as a habitability issue.  That means your landlord has to deal with this, especially since it isn't an isolated incident.  I would send a polite, carefully and accurately stated letter about the problem to your landlord, keeping a copy, as soon as possible.

If your landlord doesn't take care of this, please see an attorney in your area.  You pay the rent, and you're entitle to be free of problems like this.  One place to find a lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com


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