If I was not notified of a change in my financial aid award, what are my rights?

When I got accepted to a university. They sent me my award letter telling me the estimated amount I was going to receive for financial aid. Since I was a freshmen I didn’t know the procedures but I set up a account online and have been paying every month based on the letter they sent me in June. This month I got a statement that says my balance is $8,000 more than the amount I had thought I was going to pay (based on the letter that was sent to me 9 months ago). I went to the financial aid office and they said that they were supposed to send me a letter 5 months ago that said the adjusted amount but they didn’t. Is there legal problems with what they did? Because if I knew I was supposed to pay that much more I probably wouldn’t have attended the school.  

Asked on March 8, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, California

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately for you I do not see a legal issue with respect to the question that you are writing about in which the balance owed is $8,000 more than what you anticipated for school. The costs for your education are what they are.

I suggest that if you believe that you have been overcharged for your education that you need to sit down with a person with the financial aid department and go over your obligations versus what you actually spent. Since you are presumably an adult and are in school, you need to take direct responsibility for the costs of your education.


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