How do I respond to a debt collector after my debt has been moved to different collectors 5 or 6 times without verification?.

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How do I respond to a debt collector after my debt has been moved to different collectors 5 or 6 times without verification?.

I have a credit card debt, I defaulted about 2 1/2 years ago after a personal problem. It went to collections and then it was turned over to a debt collector. It has now been passed through the offices of 5 different debt collection companies. Each time I have responded with a detailed letter which I obtained on the internet asking for verification that I owed this debt to them and it subsequently moves to the next company. No one even answers my request for verification, they just seem to move it around. What to do next?

Asked on March 8, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Florida

Answers:

Kevin Bessant / Law Office of Kevin Bessant & Associates

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Unfortunately, debt collection agencies will pass unpaid debts onto a new Debt Collection agency for a profit. When this is done, situations like yours will occur on a continuous basis. Under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) if a debt collector/agency cannot verify that a particular debt belongs to you within a thirty day period, they must by law cease collection efforts unless they are able to verify. Not certain what the letter you use asking for verification states, but it must state the relevant law, and strictly forbid the debt collection agency from collecting on the debt or passing the debt onto other agencies until it is verified. If this collection effort has shown negatively on your consumer credit report, I would also contact the credit bureau's and inform them of your efforts to have this debt verified, and to allow the credit bureau's to dispute this information. If after 45 days, the collection agencies fails to respond to the credit bureau investigation, or fails to verify that the information on your credit report is accurate, then the credit bureau must delete this negative information from your credit report as well.


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