What is the extent on mental harrasment by management in the workplace?

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What is the extent on mental harrasment by management in the workplace?

My grandmother just found out today that her engine in her car is “blown up.” She called into work because she was scheduled to work the next 2 days. She was attempting to find a ride there so she could still make it there with no success. She informed her boss of the issue and explained her situation and he told her to either quit or she would be fired. So he wouldn’t have to pay unemployment Irate and feeling harrased due to her financial problems she took his advice and quit on the phone with him which he followed with a chuckle and shrood comment. Does she have any sort of harrasment case with this company since she “technically” quit?

Asked on August 24, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

As a general matter, an employer may terminate an employee who lacks an employment contract for any reason, at any time; and an employer may also "harass" employees, even to the point where they quit rather than continue to face it. However, there are some limits, and one limit that may be relevant here is that an employer may not discriminate against or harass an employee is 40 years old or older on account of his or her age. If your grandmother feels that she was the victime of this behavior because the employer wanted to get rid of an older employee, she may have a cause of action, and may wish to either speak with an employment law attorney, or else contact her state's equal or civil rights agency.

 


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