What is the concept called that says that conditions not included in a contract, but tacitly granted consistently over time, become rights?

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What is the concept called that says that conditions not included in a contract, but tacitly granted consistently over time, become rights?

My landlord has over 9 years cooled the building with a swamp cooler system which he now refuses to run. To me this is like a defacto rent increase in that a service previously included no longer is and without explanation or reason.

Asked on June 16, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Colorado

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If there is a written lease, then generally speaking, a course of conduct by either party (landlord or tenant) which is outside of or does not comport with the lease does not create any rights  or obligations; if one party voluntarily did more than the lease required, that does not require them to keep doing more. So the fact that the landlord formerly used this cooling system does  not obligate him or her to keep doing so.

If without the use of this system, however, the building is effectively "uninhabitable"--e.g. not fit for use as a residence--that may constitute a violation of the "implied warranty of habitability" and give rise to a legal claim: in this instance, you could potentially sue for a court order directing the landlord to cool the building better and/or seeking monetary compenesation. However, this is a very fact-specific inquiry: what constitutes a violation in one case may not in another. If you are interested in possibly pursuing this avenue for relief, you should speak with a landlord-tenant attorney about your situation.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption