What to do if the company my mom works for re-evaluated all their employees and determined she is now ineligible for their group health insurance because she is not ‘full-time

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What to do if the company my mom works for re-evaluated all their employees and determined she is now ineligible for their group health insurance because she is not ‘full-time

Her work hours/job did not change at all. During their evaluation they determined she actually does not work enough hours to be considered full-time. She works for a food service company that’s contracted by a school district, so she has a typical teacher-type schedule. Generally M-F, with the exception of some no school days, and hours 6:30 am to 2:00 pm. She starts in mid-August and works through May. Plus, some shorter hours during June and July for a summer lunch program. She was denied group coverage, had to purchase some virtually useless health care plan off the marketplace marketplace is too expensive and now she has been diagnosed with cancer. Before going forward with figuring out other options on how to pay for everything I need to get this part figured out. And make sure what her company did is legal. What is considered a full-time employee? Is this determined individually by each employer?

Asked on April 4, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, South Dakota

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 2 years ago | Contributor

Yes, what is "full time" is defined by each employer, but is generally around 35 hours per week--so around 7 hours per day, 5 days a week.
Your mother worked during he school year around 7.5 hours per day for 4 days, or 30 hours a week during her busy weeks (you write that she worked shorter hours sometimes during the summer). As such, she would fall beneath the generally accepted full-time threshold.


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