Whatare a tenant’s responsibilityies/rights regarding their lease if a roommate moves out?

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Whatare a tenant’s responsibilityies/rights regarding their lease if a roommate moves out?

I’m currently renting a home and my lease is up 12/01. My roommate, who signed the lease with me, moved out a month ago and informed the landlord that he was moving. She never asked any questions about it or even offered me a new/different lease. She is now telling me that I am required to stay and pay for another month because I myself never said anything about moving out. Is there anyway to get out of that considering that the lease is now changed and nothing new was ever signed? Shouldn’t she be obligated to ask if I plan on staying when my lease is coming to an end?

Asked on November 23, 2010 under Real Estate Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

S.L,. Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

If a tenant moves, the remaining tenant still remains liable for the rent. Although your lease ends on Dec. 1, you would still have to give the requisite written notice to terminate the tenancy.  If you do not give timely written notice to terminate the tenancy, the tenancy will continue as a month-to month tenancy.  If your lease is month-to- month, you would have to give 30 days written notice to terminate the tenancy.  It is not the landlord's obligation to inquire if a tenant is going to stay when the end of a lease term is approaching.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption