DoI have a right to receive statements of my payments to a collection agency?

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DoI have a right to receive statements of my payments to a collection agency?

I have been going to the post office and making copies of my bills and sending payment out. I spoke to a couple of people at the collection office about them sending out a statement of monies received or monies still owed. The folks told me they don’t send them out. I received statements at the beginning but slow but sure they stopped sending them out. I’ve been good at doing this every month, but now I’m tired of doing their job. I thought about sending a registered letter saying – no receipt, no money. Don’t I have a right to this sheet of paper?

Asked on August 10, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Maryland

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Do you mean that you want a statement of account or for them to physically send you a receipt for the monies paid once they receive and process the payment?  I am assuming that you are mailing payments either by check or money order and copying the form of payment.  If it is a check then your cancelled check (or the image of the one presented for payment in this day of technology) would be your proof and really, your receipt.  The money order is a but more difficult to prove paid.  I am also hoping that you send it with at least a certificate of mailing from the post office to prove that you sent it.  What you want to request is a statement of account.  That you are legally entitled to.  You request a statement for a specific time frame or for the entire time the account has been opened.  They can not deny you this request.  Good luck.


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