What can I do if I think that the executor of my mother’s Will has not been forthcoming with me about estate matters?

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What can I do if I think that the executor of my mother’s Will has not been forthcoming with me about estate matters?

My late mom had a Will. She named my only other sibling, my sister, executor. Everything was supposed to be split 50/50. My sister has been very vague with me. The only communication I have with her is when I email her and ask for my part of the money. My mom had a few lake lots and a mobile home that was and still is being rented for $700 monthly. The last time she sent me anything was 4 months ago and she sent me a check for $500 with no explanations as to what portions of what it was derived by. She sold all my mother’s furniture and car and I have no idea or proof of what anything sold for. She is 12 years older than I am and we have never been close. I just feel that I shouldn’t be the one always having to ask for my part.

Asked on December 30, 2014 under Estate Planning, Texas

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 6 years ago | Contributor

I am so sorry for your loss. You should know that the probate of a Will is a public record sot he best thing for you to do is to start by taking a look at the Probate file.  That should give you a list of your Mother's assets and a good checklist for the accounting that your sister must do as to what happened to estate assets.  If, however, you think that she is not be forthcoming then you have a right to ask the court for a conference and an informal accounting as to the status of the matter. I would suggest that you seek help from an attorney in your area.  Good luck.


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