What to do if our landlord has taken it upon herself to show our apartment with little to no warning, since we have given notice?

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What to do if our landlord has taken it upon herself to show our apartment with little to no warning, since we have given notice?

Our lease states she can enter during reasonable hours. I asked her not to show the apt on Saturday as I’m moving that day. She refused. I let her know that I would state true facts about the apartment that paint an ugly picture of what it is like to live there is she showed the apt then. She then stated I would be impeding her right to do business and could face legal ramifications for speaking to her clients in my own home. Is this true?

Asked on June 17, 2015 under Real Estate Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

Yes, if you interfere with her right to sell or lease her unit, you could potentially face legal action if the *slightest* thing you say is untrue, exaggerated, or incorrect (if there is any negative untruth, it is defamation; and uttering defamation to damage another's business is tortious interference with economic advantage); and while if you only make 100% true statements, you *should* be legally fine, that may be cold comfort if you are sued by her and have to spend time and money defending yourself, with always a chance--even if you believe you spoke the truth--of losing (since you can ever predict the outcome of a trial absolutely). What you propose to do is dangerous and is not recommended.

 


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