What to do if my fiancee is getting a doberman service dogbut my landlord says that he can’t have it on the property because of insurance issues?

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What to do if my fiancee is getting a doberman service dogbut my landlord says that he can’t have it on the property because of insurance issues?

I’ve been living here for 3 months now waiting for her disability and service dog papers to go through and now we may lose our home. I tried arguing that it isn’t actually a pet and so it shouldn’t qualify as an issue but he replied about the insurance not covering it and how people try to get pit bulls as service dogs and he can’t let them either. What can I do? When I asked him what insurance company it was, he said it was none of my business. My renter’s insurer is fine with it.

Asked on March 7, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Utah

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

This may be a case of illegal housing discrimination. Federal law prohibits discrimination against certain categories of people (e.g. the disabled), and your state law may reinforce this protection. A landlord must make "reasonable accomodations" to someone with a disability, and there is a good chance that allowing a service dog for someone with a disability is just such an accomodation. You should contact the federal Dept. of Housing and any state or local housing agencies; you might also contact from disabled support or advocacy groups, who may have legal resources (lawyers) who will help with this matter; or you could contact a housing attorney on your own, or legal services if you can't afford an attorney. This may be a situation where you and your fiance do have some rights and recourse. Good luck.


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