My father has credit cards in his name on them that he knows nothing about, what can we do if his wife opened them without his knowledge?

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My father has credit cards in his name on them that he knows nothing about, what can we do if his wife opened them without his knowledge?

To elaborate, my father’s soon-to-be ex-wife has opened several credit cards using my father’s name. One he is the only name on the card and another he the primary and his wife is the secondary. My father has never agreed to opening any type of credit card. He’s never had a credit card and does not intend on ever getting or using one. We believe all of the application process was done either over the phone or on line.

Asked on December 1, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Virginia

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Call each and every credit card (or ask your Father to do so) and ask them to send him the original application with his signature on it.  Then make sure that your Father brings this to the attention of his attorney who needs to bring it to the attention of the authorities.  This is fraud and identity theft and his ex wife can get in to very serious trouble.  But really make sure that things are the way that you say that they are.  Maybe your Father just does not want to admit that e opened these accounts maybe for her and now things went south.  Sometimes that is a hard thing to admit.  Good luck.


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