Can I appeal the decision in a civil matter?

The question of whether a case outcome can be appealed depends primarily on the type of case and the court where the case was heard. Criminal cases have a Constitutional appeal by right, whereas some civil and administrative cases can not be appealed. When determining whether your case can be appealed, the first person you should consult is your trial attorney.

→ Read More

Can the outcome of a civil case be appealed?

A civil case is a noncriminal lawsuit usually involving private property rights. A civil lawsuit may involve any one of hundreds of circumstances, including breach of contract, probate, divorce, negligence, or copyright violations. A typical civil case will usually involve one ‘party’ suing another for money or other property. The term ‘party’ can include individuals, businesses, and government agencies. A civil case or civil lawsuit may also be filed to force a party to cease a course of conduct or refrain from committing a certain act such as picketing or disclosing confidential information.

→ Read More

The other side is appealing, what does that mean?

An appeal means that one of the parties is requesting that the decision in your case be looked at again by a higher court. In other words, they are arguing that something went wrong with the first decision and that it should be changed. In most cases, the appeals process is somewhat limited; you probably aren’t going to have to go to court again, and the appellate court (the one reviewing the decision) is probably going to give a lot of deference to the trial court decision.

→ Read More

Filing an Appeal in a Civil Case

All civil cases have the right to one appeal. This means that you can draft a letter to the state board of appeals explaining why the decision should be changed. The first matter to consider when deciding whether to appeal your case is whether there were any errors made during the trial. Without an error, you have nothing to appeal. The most common errors in civil cases include errors of law, errors of fact, and errors in fact collecting. The next important factor to consider for your appeal is timing. In most state and federal cases, a motion to appeal must be filed within 30 days of the verdict’s publication.

→ Read More