Is it legal to ban me from a workplace if I didn’t give a 2 week notice?

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Is it legal to ban me from a workplace if I didn’t give a 2 week notice?

So recently I gave my job a week notice I was leaving for another job. The day before my last day my boss texted me and asked me if someone else could cover my shift on my last day. No one could so I ended up going in to make sure my clients were trained. He ended up sitting me down and told me I am banned from coming to the company for 90 days because I didn’t give him a 2 weeks notice. I did everything nicely and nothing was negative about how I left. Also I am the only person who has quit in who knows how long that has been banned. A trainer before me texted him the night before and still comes in all the time. We had a trainer who was fired and he wasn’t even banned. I feel like there has to be something illegal about this.

Asked on February 12, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Utah

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Yes, your former employer can do this. Whether or not your former place of business is open to the public, doesn't mean that it is not still private property. As such it can ban whomever it wishes and for whatever reason(s); that is absent some form of legally actionable discrimination. Therefore unless your being banned is a result of your race, religion, age (over 40), disability, national origin, etc., it makes no difference that others in your position are allowed on the premises.


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