Jeffrey Johnson is a legal writer with a focus on personal injury. He has worked on personal injury and sovereign immunity litigation in addition to experience in family, estate, and criminal law. He earned a J.D. from the University of Baltimore and has worked in legal offices and non-profits in Maryland, Texas, and North Carolina. He has also earned an MFA in screenwriting from Chapman Univer...

Full Bio →

Written by

UPDATED: Jan 6, 2010

Advertiser Disclosure

It’s all about you. We want to help you make the right legal decisions.

We strive to help you make confident insurance and legal decisions. Finding trusted and reliable insurance quotes and legal advice should be easy. This doesn’t influence our content. Our opinions are our own.

Editorial Guidelines: We are a free online resource for anyone interested in learning more about legal topics and insurance. Our goal is to be an objective, third-party resource for everything legal and insurance related. We update our site regularly, and all content is reviewed by experts.

As with music publishers, record companies vary in size and structure. There are “majors”, “mini-majors”, and “independents.” For example, there are large record companies called “major” labels because their product is distributed by one of the “big four” music distribution companies. These enormous distribution networks get your records moved from the manufacturing plants and into the record stores where they are sold. The big four are: BMG, UNI, SONY, and WEA. Examples of major labels include RCA Records (BMG), MCA Records (UNI), Columbia Records (SONY), and Atlantic Records (WEA).

Under the majors are the medium-sized companies called “mini-majors,” which are affiliated with and distributed through one of the big four, and which are generally co-owned by one of the majors. They include such labels as La Face Records (Arista/BMG), Maverick Records (Warner Bros/WEA), and Interscope Records (MCA/UNI).

Then there are the so-called “major-distributed independent” labels. These are created by independent production agreements with established recording artists who are unique in positions to find talent and steer them to major labels. These include such “vanity labels” like Flip/Interscope (UNI), Big Boy Entertainment/Arista (BMG), Ruffhouse/Columbia (SONY), etc.

Last but not least, there are small, true independent (“inde”) record companies that are either self-distributed or distributed through an independent distributor. They have little or no staff, no affiliations with any majors or mini-majors, and are often financed on limited or shoe-string budgets by their owners and/or investors.

(Reprinted with permission of Ruben Salazar, Esq.)