If I withdraw from a class at a university, can the university force me to pay if I withdrew on time?

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If I withdraw from a class at a university, can the university force me to pay if I withdrew on time?

They told me I am responsible for a bill but I withdrew from the class before the last allowed date. They do not have a policy that states that if you withdraw from class, you are still responsible for paying for it. I asked them to show or direct me to the page it was on in the school bulletin but they did not. I withdrew about 4 months ago and the deadline was the next day. However, they said the last day to withdraw was 3 months earlier. That is not true. I have the registers calender to prove this.

Asked on March 30, 2012 under Bankruptcy Law, Mississippi

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

When you could withdraw and get a refund (or avoid the obligation to pay, if  you did not yet pay) is governed entirely by the agreement or terms under which you took the class. If under those terms you were allowed to escape paying if you withdrew before a certain date and you did in fact withdraw in time, you should  not pay. The law has no opinion on this matter, other than to enforce whatever the terms of the agreement were.

If they insist that you pay, your options are to either pay or refuse; and if you refuse, they may send the bill to collections, sue you, and/or report a default to the credit rating agencies. Depending on how much the bill is for, it may be the best choice to pay it, even if you feel you are in the right.


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