What to do if my boss continues to hit on me?

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What to do if my boss continues to hit on me?

He crossed the sexual harassment line after my second week when he asked if he and I could sleep together. I told him no on many different occasions. There has been numerous of times where he has been so close to the point I can feel his breathe on my face. I figured if I continue to ignore him maybe he will stop. I have my own evidence against him, but, I do not believe it is enough to hold up in the court of law. I would like to if there is anything I can do? He is a very powerful business man with tides to the community which may be harder for a jury/judge to believe my word against his words.

Asked on May 4, 2012 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

From what you write, your employer seems to have sexually harassed you, which is illegal. To prove your case, were you to sue, you would need to prove his actions by a "preponderance of the evidence," or that it is more likely than not that they happened. You could use your testimony, testimony of any coworkers or witnesses, emails and texts, voicemails, or any gifts or objects he's given you, as evidence.

You have two options--either sue him for sexual harassment, or bring a complaint to your state equal rights or civil rights agency. A good first step would to consult with an employment law attorney--many provide a free initial consultation--to better understand the strength of your case, the likelihood of winning, and what you might be entitled to in terms of compensation. Then you can make an informed decision as to what to do next.


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