What to do if I was arrested for criminal conversion for shoplifting?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if I was arrested for criminal conversion for shoplifting?

It is a Class A misdemeanor. There is evidence against me. I am a junior chemical engineering student at a very demanding school. I was very low on money and was so stressed out with finals and an interview and my only dress pants had ripped at the seam. I fully regret what I did. I need to pay consequences but with this on my record the price will probably be my engineering future. I had a DUI amended to reckless and I get off informal probation almost 3 years ago. Will I get in trouble for probation violation? My hearing is tomorrow. Is there anything I can do to save my career – pretrial diversion or some other option?

Asked on November 12, 2012 under Criminal Law, Indiana

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Many jurisdictions now offer pre-trial diversion programs and deferred sentencing options-- but whether or not you will be accepted into one of these programs will depend on the prosecutor and the judge.  The fact that you have already had a history does not improve your chances.  However, it seems like you have done some things with your life since that probation-- like going to school.  You need to request a court appointed attorney or hire an attorney.  They should help you make the argument that you are a good candidate for this program considering your prior success on probation and the things that you have done to improve your skills since that time.  Because this will limit some employment options for you (since many employers are reluctant to hire persons with theft convictions), really send some time talking to your attorney and volunteering to do extra community service (or whatever else the court will require).


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption