I’ve been docked pay. I was told I’d be paid $288 and instead was paid $153. And I was given no waring of this.

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I’ve been docked pay. I was told I’d be paid $288 and instead was paid $153. And I was given no waring of this.

I worked for a promotional company on May 2nd and 3rd. I received my paycheck and saw that $144 dollars of it was missing. This was a shock because I was told I’d be paid $288. I called and asked what the problem was and they explained that the Client came into the place I was promoting and saw me copying something down from a book into a notebook, and therefore refuses to Pay me for my days work because h saw me ( for a ew minutes) not doing my job. However, I saw the guy approaching me and put my work aside, introducing him to what I was promoting. When I finished he let me know he was the client from the company. I apologized for writing in the notebook and he accepted the apology. He left ,I continued the day sans book and notebook. I received a phone call from my supervisor, and told me the client was beyond upset and apologized to him. Although I upset the client ,he is refusing to pay me for the full eight hours I worked. I emailed the company to explain myself and apologized again. This angered the situation further and the client is refusing to pay me. I am being given $50 ( $94 dollars short of my days pay) from the promotional company. But I want my full pay when I was told in the beginning I would receive $288 and was given no warning that I would not be receiving the $288 in the paycheck. So Can I get my $94?

Asked on June 8, 2009 under Employment Labor Law, New Jersey

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

I don't think so.  Your employer, or your employer's client, has docked your pay for not doing your job properly.  If there are more facts to this situation, beyond what you've included here, you should discuss the entire scenario with an attorney in your area, or the New Jersey Division of Wage and Hour Compliance.

Unless you had a written contract, however, you were employed "at will," which means that you can be fired for no reason at all.  So, a less drastic job action, docking your pay, is also usually not something the law will correct.


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