What are my rights if I moved my furniture into a storage unit but when I came to get my property it was gone?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What are my rights if I moved my furniture into a storage unit but when I came to get my property it was gone?

The storage didn’t offered insurance but they told me that someone is on the property 24/7, plus they had cameras around the property. It had been almost 3 months and no one has contacted me. I have a police report and I sent the manager the things that got stolen from me. She asked me to give her 30 days to see what the owners would say about the situation. Do I have the right to take the property and owners to court about my furniture?

Asked on January 27, 2016 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 5 years ago | Contributor

You always have the right to file  a lawsuit. Whether you win will depend on whether they were at fault in some way. If you can show that their security was less than advertised (i.e. they lied) and/or less than is standard at such facilities, or that one of their employees collaborated in the theft, you can win. But if you can't show fault, they would not be liable unless there was a guaranty or warranty that they would take responsibility for any losses or thefts. Without such a guaranty/warranty, they are only responsible if at fault, and the fact that your furniture was stolen while on their site does not, by itself, prove fault; for example, the theft could have been done by another client/customer who was lawfully on the property (which is how he/she got "past" security), and the facility is not responsible for what people not under its control do. Or the theft could have been done by any outside, but if the security was industry standard and was as advertised and the thief simply managed to bypass it, the facility is not liable--they are not held to the standard of perfect security, but only have to provide reasonable security for such a facility.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption