Is it better to file for a fiance visa or go to your fiance’s country and get married there?

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Is it better to file for a fiance visa or go to your fiance’s country and get married there?

Which option is better for us and will take less processing time, so that we can be together sooner? I am a US born citizen. My girlfriend was an international student in the US and after she finished her studies, she went back home. Now, a year after she left, we would like to get married. I can only get a 10 day vacation time in order to go and marry.

Asked on October 7, 2012 under Immigration Law, Illinois

Answers:

Harun Kazmi / Kazmi and Sakata Attorneys at Law

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Hello. It may depend on the country she is from and where she will be processing. The fiance visa is generally faster as you can avoid the National Visa Center requests for originals documents and applications. The marriage will require this additional step as well as going there and getting married. However, there are other factors to consider, such as, how much proof do you have of the relationship, etc. I typically feel the Fiance is faster, but more expensive. Once she enters and marries, you have to still file for the marriage based green card. That is an additional expense altogether. Feel free to provide more details anytime at: [email protected]

Gene Meltser, Esq. / BIRG & MELTSER

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

Both options take about 4 to 6 months to execute, depending on the country. However, you must also take into account the possibility of a fiancée visa difficulties, where a marriage can provide a more solid approach. Also, beware that foreign countries sometimes require additional documents from US citizens in order to get married. What country is she a citizen of? I would be glad to discuss this with you in detail. Please contact me directly at [email protected]


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