How much money does probate take from a 2m estate and how long does it take?Who can legally protest a will?

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How much money does probate take from a 2m estate and how long does it take?Who can legally protest a will?

Grandfather is leaving me his estate which is currently in four 500k CD’s. Banker says it will all go to probate. How long does that take and how much $ will it cost?2nd question is can is biological son he has not seen in 40 yrs. contest the will?I also had grandfather take ff my brother, can he contest it. First will was in 2006 w/brother and 2008 without. My brother does have a copy of the first will.

Asked on June 7, 2009 under Estate Planning, Florida

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

You need to hire an attorney to help with the probate of your grandfather's estate -- I'm assuming, here, that he named you as executor as well as the heir.  One place that you can find a lawyer is our website, http://attorneypages.com

How long it will take and how much will come out of the estate will depend on a number of things.  There will be taxes that have to be paid.  The estate can be settled much more quickly if nobody contests the will.

Having a will declared invalid is difficult.  Your grandfather's son who's been gone for 40 years probably knows nothing that would invalidate the will.  Your brother might be a different story, though, if you used undue influence over your grandfather to remove him, but that can be hard to prove.  There are other reasons for invalidating the will that might be possible, depending on other facts of the case.


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